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Overcoming Obstacles to Physical Activity

There are many benefits of regular physical activity; however, people often have many excuses for not being more physically active. The following is information from the American Academy of Pediatrics encouraging families to consider all the benefits of being physically active and how to overcome some obstacles. Each family member can take a step toward becoming more physically active by filling out the physical activity plan.

Benefits of being physically active

Being physically active is one way you can

Overcoming common obstacles

The following are suggestions on how to overcome 4 common barriers to physical activity.

1. “I don’t have time.”

What you can try

2. “I don’t like sports” or “I’m not good at any sports.”

What you can try

3. “My neighborhood isn’t safe.”

What you can try

4. “I’m overweight or out of shape.”

What you can try

Physical Activity Plan

Each member can use the following questions to help create a personal physical activity plan. Parents can help their children answer the questions. Parents also should remember that they can be powerful role models and can shape their children’s perception of physical activity and exercise.

  1. What are the main benefits I want from being physically active?
  2. What are the reasons or barriers that keep me from being active?
  3. If necessary, what will be my solutions to these barriers?
  4. What activity or activities am I going to do?
  5. Where am I going to do this activity?
  6. When am I going to be active (include time of day and on which days of the week)?
  7. How long or how many minutes will I be active each day?
  8. Who will be my activity buddy?

Source: Care of the Young Athlete Patient Education Handouts (Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics)

The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

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